DWTS 20 Week 5: Disney Week

The Leader Board

  1. Rumer Willis & Valentin Chmerkovskiy: 39
  2. Riker Lynch & Allison Holker/Nastia Liukin & Derek Hough: 38
  3. Willow Shields & Mark Ballas: 34
  4. Noah Galloway & Sharna Burgess: 28
  5. Suzanne Somers & Tony Dovolani: 28 ELIMINATED
  6. Chris Soules & Witney Carson: 27/Patti LaBelle &Artem Chigvintsev: 27
  7. Robert Herjavec & Kym Johnson: 24

The Dances

Chris Soules & Witney Carson: Last to be called safe

  • 27 (7, 6, 7, 7) same score
  • Quickstep
  • “Zero to Hero” from “Hercules”
  • 1-855-234-5602

Nastia Liukin & Derek Hough

Noah Galloway & Sharna Burgess

  • 28 (7, 7, 7, 7) down from 32 
  • Foxtrot
  • A Whole New World” from “Aladdin”
  • 1-855-234-5605

Patti LaBelle & Artem Chigvintsev

Riker Lynch & Allison Holker: Last to be called safe.

Robert Herjavec & Kym Johnson

Rumer Willis & Valentin Chmerkovskiy

Suzanne Somers & Tony Dovolani: ELIMINATED

  • 28 (7, 7, 7, 7) same score 28 
  • Jazz
  • “He’s a Tramp” from “Lady and the Tramp
  • 1-855-234-5611

Willow Shields & Mark Ballas

  • 34 (8, 8, 9, 9) down from 39 
  • Foxtrot
  • “Alice’s Theme” from “Alice in Wonderland
  • 1-855-234-5612

Phone voting begins during the show on Mondays, and is open until 60 minutes after the conclusion of that show in your local time zone.

Online voting at both ABC.com and Facebook opens each Monday when the show begins on the East Coast at 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) and stays open until 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) the next day. During the season’s seventh, eighth, ninth and tenth week, online voting will open when the show begins on the East Coast at 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) and will stay open until 11 a.m. ET (8 a.m. PT) the following morning.

‘Broken Horses’ breaks no new ground in the Western

Fans of Law & Order: Criminal Intent might want to see Vincent D’Onofrio sink his teeth into a juicy part, but this story, “Broken Horses,” is overdone and drier than a desert riverbed on a hot July day.

Directed and co-written (with Abhijat Joshi) by Vidhu Vinod Chopra, this doesn’t have the kind of mystery or presence of that other foreign master of the western, Sergio Leone. You have to appreciate the atmospheric presence of Ennio Morricone’s music and the long takes and great Spanish horses.

Other Asian Westerns have echoed the pathos of the Western even if set in another country like China such as the stylish “The Good, the Bad, the Weird.”

This horse opera has barely the presence of a horse and is set in contemporary times. According to IMDB, the locations were Southern California desert lands–Death Valley and Victorville. Yet the movie is set close to the Mexican border. The title refers to horses that are trained or broken and that part of breaking a horse means caring for it–even when it needs to be put down. Breaking a horse is part of loving a horse well and the person who loves that horse the best should be the one who kills it. Transfer that to people and you have John Steinbeck’s “Of Mice and Men,” but this tale, “Broken Horses,” has less of the tragic element and literary worth.

The movie begins with a sheriff in a cowboy hat who is joined by his young “slow” son at a gun range by his eldest son, Buddy (Henry Shotwell). Buddy has limp straight brown hair parted in the middle. He warns his father (Thomas Jane) that they will miss the younger boy, Jake’s (Nicholas Neve) violin recital. No one warns the two that an assassin is taking aim.

Soon after the funeral, a man Julius Henchman (David Castro) comes into the diner where Buddy works and tells him who “killed” his father and helps Buddy avenge himself. Was the guy Buddy kills really the man who plugged his father? It’s doubtful.

Buddy remains under the tutelage of kingpin Julius as his assassin. Somehow the younger brother Jakey escapes to New York where he continues his violin playing, even auditioning for the New York Philharmonic. Jakey is living with his Italian girlfriend, Vittoria (Maria Valverde) when his brother asks him to return home to their small town in the middle of the desert because he can’t wrap up his wedding present.

Buddy’s dream is to quit his job working at the local cinema and taking care of Jakey and Vittoria’s kids. That doesn’t play so well with Julius who has already punished Jakey’s old violin teacher.

There are moments that are visually stunning, but that doesn’t make up for the one hour and 40 minutes of awkward dialogue and flat tension that is only relieved by moments of violence. If there’s a future where Bollywood Westerns replace spaghetti Westerns, then we’ll need something a bit spicier than “Broken Horses.” Fans of D’Onofrio will be better served watching him on Netflix in “Daredevil.”

“Broken Horses” is currently playing at the ArcLight Hollywood, the Cinemark 18 and the Laemmle Town Center 5.

‘Wolf Hall': Woe to Wolsey in ‘Entirely Beloved’

At the beginning of the second episode of “Wolf Hall,” “Entirely Beloved,” we are still playing with three cards, but will we choose the right one? Just who are the three cards? The BBC adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s Man Booker Prize novel of the same name “Wolf Hall” continues on PBS with this episode airing on 12 April 2015 at 10 p.m.

The three card game that the clever and worldly but often woeful looking Cromwell showed Wolsey could refer to the Catholic holy trinity of the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost. Or is it the King, the Pope and the Chancellor? Or how about the King Henry (a mercurial Damian Lewis), his wife of 20 years, Catherine of Aragon (Joanne Whalley), and his current love interest, Anne Boleyn (Claire Foy)?

Then there’s another interesting threesome: Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn and Jane Seymour (Kate Phillips). All three women appear in this episode.

The book ends the chapter, “Three-Card Trick,” with a warning. Whatever you do, wherever you dine next, do not sit down with the Boleyns. And yet, for the ambitious man in King Henry VIII’s court, who can resist the temptation?

When this TV episodes begins, it is December of 1529. Wolsey (Jonathan Pryce) has taken refuge at Esher. In the book, the chapter’s full name is “Entirely Beloved Cromwell” and covers the spring through December of 1530.

Anne Boleyn and her uncle, the Duke of Norfolk (Bernard Hill), want Wolsey gone. Cromwell remains loyal to Wolsey, but instead of remaining with his Wolsey, he instead is in London.

Yet things are not easy with a king who so becomes increasingly impatient for a male heir. Cromwell thinks he has an audience with King Henry and yet when Henry arrives he tells Cromwell only that he cannot speak with him.  Stephen Gardiner (Mark Gatiss) can’t help but smirk.

In these trying times, Cromwell also needs comfort. If you recall, his wife, Liz (Natasha Little) died in the first episode along with his two daughters. He’s often alone at home, taken care of by his sister-in-law. He wonders if his brother-in-law doesn’t miss his wife. His wife’s sister, Johane Williamson (Saskia Reeves) tells Cromwell, “His duties not my pleasure.”

“There’s a conversation I shouldn’t have had,” Cromwell thinks. He is “beloved” in the court, but not by the king’s current favorite Anne. Anne summons him for a favor. Someone has passed a note to Anne picturing the queen, Catherine of Aragon, Henry and Anne, “sans tete.”

Again Cromwell has time for a mild flirtation with Mary Boleyn (Charity Wakefield), widow of  William Carey. She was married in 1520 and became King Henry VIII’s mistress by about 1521 and remained so until about 1526.  Mary has two children–a daughter Catherine born in 1524 and a son Henry Carey born in 1526. Both were rumored to be Henry’s children but before DNA we only had looks and the word of the mother to go on. Her husband Sir William Carey has just died in 1528.

Mary gets reprimanded by her younger sister Anne who declares, “This isn’t France and I’m not a fool like you Mary.” Ouch. Mary was easily discarded by Henry and there’s talk that Mary was also readily available in France.

Yet Mary tells Cromwell she wants a husband. “No, what I want is a husband who upsets them and who won’t die.”

Anne Boleyn is of an age, 28. She’s old and ambitious. She is also pushing her king and country recklessly.  “Never mind who grudges it; this will happen. I mean to have him.” Is she a gold digger or a deliciously intelligent and ambitious woman who wishes to serve her king?

If Cromwell is useful to Anne Boleyn and her family, then he just might survive while Wolsey fails in health. Cromwell rises to Privy Council, he hasn’t forgiven those who brought the downfall of Wolsey.

Norfolk describes Cromwell as  “a useful sort to employ” and Cromwell finds a way to interpret King Henry’s dreams to benefit both his king and himself. Despite Henry’s plans, Henry tells Cromwell that he misses Wolsey, the Cardinal of York, every day.

I’m sure Henry has said the same to Catherine of Aragon once and even now to Anne Boleyn. But the king also wants what his heart wants, no matter what the laws of heaven and earth might say.

Toward the end of the episode, Cromwell meets the quiet Jane Seymour, reminding us that the change that Anne Boleyn forced her lover to make, didn’t benefit her for long. If mistresses are disposable, so too are wives, particularly in the dysfunctional family of King Henry VIII.

“Wolf Hall” continues on PBS with this episode airing on 12 April 2015 at 10 p.m.  After the episode airs on TV, it will be available VoD on the PBS Masterpiece webpage.

‘Wolf Hall': Doomed commoner in King Henry VIII’s court

Much of how you receive  “Wolf Hall” may come down to how you want your history served. Do you want it hot and steamy? Do you want it sexualized with many a moment in aristocratic boudoirs? Do you want to authenticated by historians? Do you want it focused on the behind the scenes working of men, minds and the machinations of rising in a dangerous world? And finally: Are you Catholic?

“Wolf Hall” is based on two historical novels by Hilary Mantel: “Wolf Hall” and “Bring Up the Bodies.” The title itself is based on the name of the Seymour family based, Wulfhall in Wiltshire, but also reference to a Latin saying, “Homo homini lupus” or “Man is wolf to man.” This is a behind the scenes meditation on survival in desperate times, close to power and close to death.

The novel’s focus is on Thomas Cromwell, a man born to a working class family (a black smith) who rose to power under Cardinal Thomas Wolsey and helped maneuver King Henry VIII’s divorce from his first wife, then his second and was out of power by the third. Cromwell is portrayed here as a family man with modern sensibilities toward his daughters.

Accusations have been made that the novel portrays Cromwell in a more sympathetic light than is historically accurate and must vilify his opponent, Thomas More. More is the subject of Robert Bolt’s classic 1960 play, “A Man for All Seasons.”

Sir Thomas More was the Chancellor of England who refused to endorse King Henry VIII’s divorce to his wife of 20 years, Catherine of Aragon, so that he might marry the much younger Anne Boleyn, sister of his former mistress. In Bolt’s play, the king, Wolsey and Cromwell are depicted as corrupt. More is a man who sticks to his principles and dies because of it under the king’s orders.

The TV series begins not with Cromwell, but with Wolsey. He is old and his station and power are now threatened by his inability to broker a divorce for the king from Catherine of Aragon from the pope.

In the first episode of this mini series, “Three Card Trick,” the opening text sets up the situation. The year is 1529. Henry VIII (Damian Lewis) has been married to Catherine of Aragon (Joanne Whalley) for 20 years.  For the last two years, Wolsey (Jonathan Pryce) has been petitioning the Pope on behalf of a divorce decree for Henry. He has only failed Henry in this one matter, but Henry is not a forgiving man.

Men on horses arrive in the dark and are led to Wolsey, an old man who fiddles with his great jeweled cross and looks at the large rings on his fingers as he waits for them to come through the candlelit hallways.

Norfolk (Bernard Hill) and Suffolk (Richard Dillane) stand before him and announce, “You’re dismissed as Lord Chancellor.”

“You’ll have supper?” he asks.

They demand he hand over the Great Seal. A man whispers in Wolsey’s ear advice on the legality of their request. That man is Thomas Cromwell (Mark Rylance).

After Wolsey has his wardrobe, plates and other furnishings taken from him and must leave his residence behind, he still remains calm. With his men are in a boat, he cautions, “I will not hear a word against Henry from any man,”

Flashing back eight years earlier, Anne Boleyn (Claire Foy) has been brought back and flirted with Harry Percy, a matter that comes under discussion by Wolsey and her father Sir Thomas Boleyn. This Wosley is an entirely different man, in control, with a resounding voice, and arrogant manner. Cromwell waits listening in the shadows with Stephen Gardiner (Mark Gatiss).

Wolsey demands that Thomas Boleyn take control of his daughter. She is simply a political pawn, something to be used.

Cromwell is the butcher boy’s dog. He entertains Wolsey with a three card trick and reveals that he has lived dangerously–he once made a bet about a snake, not knowing if it was poisonous or not.

Cromwell wanders into this murky moral landscape because of ambition. He wants to do more than “spend my life dealing in conveyances” he tells his patient wife. His wife chides him for never visiting his own father nor introducing his children to their grandfather.

Soon, his wife and sweet girls are dead from the “sweating sickness,” sending Cromwell back to his father, a cruel crude black smith who has not become kinder with old age.

To his father, Cromwell is somehow foreign. To the rest of the English court, the French-educated Anne Boleyn is foreign. The tenderness Cromwell displayed toward his daughter and the patience he showed toward her declaration of love for Cromwell’s ward sharply contrast his assessment of Anne Boleyn and her physical charms, even with her sister Mary (Charity Wakefield) who assures him that her sister remains a virgin.

Cromwell also has bold words with the king when the king challenges Cromwell’s feelings that the king shouldn’t lead troops into France because England no longer holds major pieces of coastal land. What’s a king to do? “Do you want a king to huddle indoors like a sick girl?” Henry asks.

“That would be ideal for fiscal purposes,” Cromwell replies.

Historically, Wolsey would fall from the king’s favor as well and More succeeded him as Lord Chancellor. Wosley avoided death by treason by dying en route to London to answer charges of treason.

Catherine as Dowager of the Prince of Wales, outlived Thomas More, dying a year later in 1536. Cromwell died in 1540.

 Historian David Starkey calls “Wolf Hall” a “deliberate perversion” of history. Of course the scenes between Cromwell and his wife and two daughters are fictional. Yet Starkey finds that Cromwell and the man who would become his enemy, Thomas More, are misrepresented. More was the kindly affectionate father where there seems to be not proof that Cromwell was.

The author, Hilary Mantel,  did spend five years doing research, but she is reportedly anti-Catholic, telling The Telegraph the Catholic Church “is not an institution for respectable people.” Starkey also takes issue with another series: “The Tudors” which he has called “gratuitously awful.”

The American Catholic Church has taken issue with the series.

On the positive side, is Foy’s portrayal of the ambitious Anne Boleyn. There’s an exuberant intelligence and an ego to match. We fully understand the enormous demands Anne is making, one that would transform England and result in many deaths long after she lost her head.

“Wolf Hall” Episode 1 was broadcast on 5 April 2015 and is streaming until 3 May 2015. You can also buy the DVD.

‘White Dog’ exposes a racist practice

White Dog” is a movie doomed by concerns of political correctness and received a limited release in the US as a result. It’s topic matter might have boosted the movie’s profile, despite the stilted acting and awkward dialogue. Currently available to stream on Amazon.com, the movie might pique your interest due to comparisons made to a Hungarian movie with a similar title: “White God.”

The comparison was made by Variety in a review of the foreign film by Guy Lodge who wrote “Otherwise given no explanation in the film, the title ‘White God’ may be a tip of the hat to Samuel Fuller, whose 1982 race-relations allegory ‘White Dog’ takes a similarly conflicted view of the relationship between man and his supposed best friend.”

“White Dog is a 1982 drama based on a Romain Gary’s 1970 novel of the same name. Gary was married to the tragic Jean Seberg between 1962-1970. Seberg died from an overdose of barbiturates at the age of 40 in Paris. Gary committed suicide, dying from a self-inflicted gunshot wound in Paris in 1980. The book, originally published in French under the title “Chien Blanc” was based on his own experiences when he and Seberg took in a stray dog that had been trained to attack black people and their subsequent attempts to rehabilitate the dog. By the time he wrote the book, Gary was divorced from Seberg and some critics feel he used the book both sides of the Civil Rights Movement–the white racists and the activists for black rights.

The book is set in Alabama. The movie’s title refers both to the dog itself, a white German Shepherd Dog, and the kind of training the dog received–it was a dog meant for white people. Instead of a couple, the movie focuses in on a young unmarried white actress (Kristy McNichol) who finds a dog and discovers that it kills black people. Paul Winfield plays Keys, a black dog trainer who becomes obsessed with re-training the dog, who works under Carruthers (Burl Ives) who would put the dog down.

While the theme of the movie is that racism is learned, the script doesn’t give us much sympathy for the characters and the consequences of their actions are dismissed. The dog kills a truck driver and an elderly man in church and still Keys wants to deprogram this dangerous dog.

While in the book, the dog was a former Alabama police dog, in the movie, the dog belongs to an elderly white man with grandchildren whom Julie confronts toward the end of the movie. The dog, once taught to kill and having killed, is not likely to be a good pet for anyone.

Director Samuel Fuller co-wrote the script with Curtis Hanson. The 90-minute movie has too many moments of stilted dialogue and clunky transitions. The movie was release internationally in France and the UK in 1982 and was broadcast on cable TV in the US. Its official American release was in 2008 via DVD thanks to The Criterion Collection.

The dog is handsome and actively appealing, the cast tries heroically to rise above the material. The subject matter is certainly worth thinking about, but this movie isn’t really a worthy vehicle.

Annie Lennox and ‘Nostalgia’ a must-see on ‘Great Performances’

In February, Annie Lennox put a spell on viewers of the 57th Grammy Awards in mid-February. She was dressed simply in a loose black shirt and pants. Her platinum blonde hair was cut short.

Lennox didn’t need to show flesh, to dance or to push boundaries in any way to impress music lovers. Instead, she used her voice to cast a spell.

Instead of making rock music, now she’s gone back to jazz classics. We’re all lucky for this bit of “Nostalgia” which is the name of her most recent album. If you don’t have this Grammy-nominated album and even if you do, then you’ll want to see this concert on PBS Great Performances which is currently VoD on PBS. This performance originally was aired on 3 April 2015. The video expires on 30 April 2015.

Song List

Memphis in June
Georgia on My Mind
I Put a Spell on You
Summertime
I Cover the Waterfront
Strange Fruit
God Bless the Child
September in the Rain
The Nearness of You
Mood Indigo

Encores:

Here Comes the Rain Again
Why

DWTS 20 Week 4: Most Memorable Year Night

On Week 4 of Season 20, “Dancing with the Stars,” another man left the ballroom, but two women received tens on Most Memorable Year Night.

Although Natia Liukin dancing with Derek Hough got the first 10 of the season, it was Willow Shields dancing with Mark Ballas who received three tens for an almost perfect score of 39.

  • Willow Shields & Mark Ballas: 39
  • Nastia Liukin & Derek Hough: 36
  • Rumer Willis & Valentin Chmerkovskiy: 35
  • Riker Lynch & Allison Holker/Robert Herjavec & Kym Johnson: 34
  • Noah Galloway & Sharna Burgess: 32
    • Michael Sam & Peta Muratroyd: 30 ELIMINATED
    • Patti LaBelle &Artem Chigvintsev: 30
  • Suzanne Somers & Tony Dovolani: 28
  • Chris Soules & Witney Carson: 27

Nastia Liukin & Derek Hough started out the night. For her, the year she competed at the Beijing Olympics was her Most Memorable Year: 2008.

She competed on Floor Exercise to “Dark Eyes.” Liukin was trained by her parents, both former gymnasts to she  dedicated the night to her parents.

Head judge Len Goodman said that while that was a fantastic dance– clean and physical, the character of the dance was missing.

Julianne Hough was more enthusiastic and told Liukin, “You nailed it in 2008 and you nailed it tonight.”

Bruno Tonioli called it exhilarating in shape and shade.

Liukin got one ten and four nines.

It was Feb 9, 2014 that  Michael Sam (with Peta Murgatroyd) made his announcement. On that day, Michael Sam announced he was gay. His father didn’t speak directly to him, but was quoted in a newspapers as saying that he was disappointed. Sam had already lost his father once, but felt the lost his father again that year.

Hough found his performance so vulnerable and noted that footwork had improved and that he was pointing his toes.

Tonioli commented, “You should be very proud of yourself” because it took an “enormous amount of guts” to come out to the world. “Your dancing tonight, my darling was the best you’ve ever done.”

Inaba said,  “You understood why all of us dance,” and commended him for  “sharing a moment of your inside.” She did caution him that sometimes his posture wasn’t good.

Goodman commented that progress is like a tunnel and that “tonight you came out and you’re in the light.” Michael Sam and  Peta Murgatroyd were eliminated.

Riker Lynch & Allison Holker were all about last year when Lynch and the band he formed with his brothers had been together seven years and were finally making it.

Lynch is a pleasure to watch and he was bravely dancing in bright red suit.

Tonioli called him “a vibrant neon light.” He also noted that although “that music was so hard to interpret to a tango,” Lynch was crisp and clear and very tango.

Inaba said he was “dancing wider and broader,” but also thought “the was chemistry a bit off tonight.”

Goodman felt the dance was “a tad on the hectic side,” and he wanted “the hold a little tighter,” yet the performances was “better than last week and I’m proud of you.”

Hough cautioned Lynch to watch his right shoulder which tends to go a bit forward.”

The judges couldn’t believe “you guys are in jeopardy now.” It would be a major disappointment for me if Lynch left.

Robert Herjavec & Kym Johnson looked at 2006 which was an emotional year for Herjavec. In 2005, his mother was diagnosed with stage 4 ovarian cancer. Despite all his financial resources, there was nothing he could do to forestall her death the next year.

Herjavec was dancing to her favorite song. “She’d dance around the house.”

Goodman told him, “It’s your best dance.” He was sure, “Your mum is looking down right now and cheering and cheering.”

Hough commented, “Your frame was incredible,” and noted he has “the best footwork and best technique of all the guys.”

She also noted that the choreography was classic and gorgeous.

Tonioli said it was strictly ballroom and absolutely wonderful.

Reality TV star Chris Soules & Witney Carson chose last year, 2014 when he became “The Bachelor” after his sister wrote a letter. Even though he did become engaged, they broke it off.

They danced within a rectangle set off by an outline of lightbulbs. Soules was a little stiff.

Goodman was the first to comment and told Soules that “purely on the dancing, that wasn’t that great.”

Hough as more positive and noted,  “every week you have improved,” but also said Soule and Carson were “missing a little bit of connection.”

Tonioli said his dancing was  “extremely genuine and very honest.” Tonioli told Soules that his turns were much better but he needs “a little bit more flow of movement.”

Inaba said she felt the passion, and looked like he was actually enjoying himself now. We can’t enjoy his dancing if he’s not enjoying himself.

Patti LaBelle who dances with Artem Chigvintsev chose 1973, the year her son was born. Up until then she was a traveling singer and she even toured until her 9th month.

Hough exclaimed, “I want to dance with you.”

Tonioli called the dance “hot.”

Goodman said there was “plenty of giggle, plenty of wiggle” and like it was a “cappuccino of a dance, light and frothy.”

Rumer Willis who dances with Valentin Chmerkovskiy said 2014 was the year she finally felt confidence in herself. Growing up she compared herself to her mother, Demi Moore.

Plenty of people said mean things about her face and her head shape.

Tonioli said Willis had “an uncanny ability to connect with the character of your dance” but to watch her developée and point her toes.

Inaba noted that she loved the velocity with which Willis moves that she dances “10 feet beyond where your arms end.”

Goodman felt that it was a great dance but wondered:  “Is it a waltz?”

Hough commented that Willis “was strong and so vulnerable.” She also said, “Carrie Ann is right, when you dance, you’re dancing for every girl.”

Suzanne Somers and Tony Dovolani were next. Somers chose 1977, the year she was cast in the sitcom “Three’s Company.” Up until then, she had not been really successful as an actress. “The chemistry I had with John Ritter happens once in a lifetime” if one’s lucky. That comment made me think: What about her TV show husband, Patrick Duffy on the ABC “Step by Step” (1991 to 1998). Somer was on the show from 1977 to 1981, with the last year having a substantially diminished role. Her contract was not renewed and she was replaced by Jenilee Harrison and later Priscilla Barnes. The show ended in 1982 after eight seasons.

Still, Somer dedicated the dance to the late John Ritter.

Inaba felt this was Somer’s breakthrough dance where she finally says “hello to the competition” because she showed “more depth, showed us  elegance, showed us grace.”

Goodman simply commented, “I liked the concept, liked the content, liked the dance.”

Hough warned Somer to work on her upper body because she tends to bring up her shoulders.

Tonioli felt there was “an evergreen quality of classic sitcom” in the performance and told her to be “careful not to lose your neck.”

Willow Shields and Mark Ballas were all about 2011 when Shields got the part on “The Hunger Games.”

Goodman admitted that he had never seen the Hunger Games but found the dance fantastic.

Hough called the performance incredible and noted that Shields’ “center of gravity getting lower and deeper.”

Tonioli felt the dance was “a triumph for my little warrior” and she was “actually attacking every move with absolute sense of purpose.”

Inaba noted it was one of the most difficult dances.

Noah Galloway & Sharna Burgess chose year he was injured: 2005. Galloway was into the third month of his second tour of duty. He was injured in an IED attack and lost his left leg above the knee and his left arm. Galloway woke up six days later on Christmas. Since then it’s been a journey of acceptance.

Hough commented on “how strong and how focused” he is, but feltthere was “something different, something that was free, something that was so beautiful” in his performance. “You astonish us every single week.”

Tonioli said, “Your spirit is unbroken” and called him “the ultimate role model” and a “superhero.”

Inaba compared his performance to  haiku. In haiku, “with very few words, you say something very profound.”

Goodman told Galloway,  You are an inspiration. I think everyone here should stand up and applaud you.”

The Dances

Chris Soules & Witney Carson

  • 27 (7, 6, 7, 7) down from 28 (7, 7, 7, 7) 
  • Rumba
  • The Book of Love“—Gavin James
  • 1-855-234-5602

Michael Sam & Peta Murgatroyd

  • 30 (7, 7, 8, 8) up from 24 (6, 6, 6, 6)
  • Rumba
  • “Not My Father’s Son”—from Kinky Boots
  • 1-855-234-5603

Nastia Liukin & Derek Hough

  • 36 (9, 8, 9, 10) up from 34 (9, 8, 8, 9) 
  • Argentine tango
  • “Variations on Dark Eyes”—Lara St. John
  • 1-855-234-5604

Noah Galloway & Sharna Burgess

Patti LaBelle & Artem Chigvintsev

  • 30 (8, 7, 7, 8) up from 22 
  • Jazz
  • “Dan Swit Me”—Patti LaBelle
  • 1-855-234-5606

Riker Lynch & Allison Holker: Last to be called safe.

Robert Herjavec & Kym Johnson

Rumer Willis & Valentin Chmerkovskiy

Suzanne Somers & Tony Dovolani

  • 28 (7, 7, 7, 7) up from 25 
  • Foxtrot
  • “Three’s Company, Too”—Ray Charles & Julia Rinker
  • 1-855-234-5611

Willow Shields & Mark Ballas

  • 39 (10, 9, 10, 10) up from 32 
  • Contemporary
  • Atlas“—Coldplay
  • 1-855-234-5612

Phone voting begins during the show on Mondays, and is open until 60 minutes after the conclusion of that show in your local time zone.

Online voting at both ABC.com and Facebook opens each Monday when the show begins on the East Coast at 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) and stays open until 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) the next day. During the season’s seventh, eighth, ninth and tenth week, online voting will open when the show begins on the East Coast at 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) and will stay open until 11 a.m. ET (8 a.m. PT) the following morning.

DWTS 20 Week 4: First tens and another man leaves the ballroom

On Week 4 of Season 20, “Dancing with the Stars,” another man left the ballroom and the first ten was awarded. In all two ladies received tens, but only one received more than one to take her to the top of the leader board.

  • Willow Shields & Mark Ballas: 39
  • Nastia Liukin & Derek Hough: 36
  • Rumer Willis & Valentin Chmerkovskiy: 35
  • Riker Lynch & Allison Holker/Robert Herjavec & Kym Johnson: 34
  • Noah Galloway & Sharna Burgess: 32
    • Michael Sam & Peta Muratroyd: 30 ELIMINATED
    • Patti LaBelle &Artem Chigvintsev: 30
  • Suzanne Somers & Tony Dovolani: 28
  • Chris Soules & Witney Carson: 27

 

The Dances

Chris Soules & Witney Carson

  • 27 (7, 6, 7, 7) down from 28 (7, 7, 7, 7) 
  • Rumba
  • The Book of Love“—Gavin James
  • 1-855-234-5602

Michael Sam & Peta Murgatroyd

  • 30 (7, 7, 8, 8) up from 24 (6, 6, 6, 6)
  • Rumba
  • “Not My Father’s Son”—from Kinky Boots
  • 1-855-234-5603

Nastia Liukin & Derek Hough

  • 36 (9, 8, 9, 10) up from 34 (9, 8, 8, 9) 
  • Argentine tango
  • “Variations on Dark Eyes”—Lara St. John
  • 1-855-234-5604

Noah Galloway & Sharna Burgess

Patti LaBelle & Artem Chigvintsev

  • 30 (8, 7, 7, 8) up from 22 
  • Jazz
  • “Dan Swit Me”—Patti LaBelle
  • 1-855-234-5606

Riker Lynch & Allison Holker: Last to be called safe.

Robert Herjavec & Kym Johnson

Rumer Willis & Valentin Chmerkovskiy

Suzanne Somers & Tony Dovolani

  • 28 (7, 7, 7, 7) up from 25 
  • Foxtrot
  • “Three’s Company, Too”—Ray Charles & Julia Rinker
  • 1-855-234-5611

Willow Shields & Mark Ballas

  • 39 (10, 9, 10, 10) up from 32 
  • Contemporary
  • Atlas“—Coldplay
  • 1-855-234-5612

Phone voting begins during the show on Mondays, and is open until 60 minutes after the conclusion of that show in your local time zone.

Online voting at both ABC.com and Facebook opens each Monday when the show begins on the East Coast at 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) and stays open until 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) the next day. During the season’s seventh, eighth, ninth and tenth week, online voting will open when the show begins on the East Coast at 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) and will stay open until 11 a.m. ET (8 a.m. PT) the following morning.

DWTS 20, Week 3: Too busy to focus, means no second chance

On Week 3 of Season 20, “Dancing with the Stars,” the woman who couldn’t focus on dancing during her practice sessions left the ballroom during Latin Night.

Other stars were also busy with work and even school, but had better time management skills.

  • Nastia Liukin & Derek Hough: 34
  • Riker Lynch & Allison Holker: 34
  • Rumer Willis & Valentin Chmerkovskiy: 33
  • Willow Shields & Mark Ballas: 32
  • Noah Galloway & Sharna Burgess: 30
  • Robert Herjavec & Kym Johnson: 29
  • Chris Soules & Witney Carson: 28
  • Suzanne Somers & Tony Dovolani: 25
  • Michael Sam & Peta Muratroyd: 24
  • Patti LaBelle &Artem Chigvintsev: 22
  • Charlotte McKinney &Keoikantse Motsepe: 22 ELIMINATED

Charlotte McKinney & Keoikantse Motsepe

22 (6, 5, 5, 6) down from 26 ELIMINATED

Rumba

“Empire”—Shakira

1-855-234-5601

Chris Soules & Witney Carson

28 (7, 7, 7, 7) up from 21 but last to be called safe

Argentine tango

“Dangerous”—David Guetta feat. Sam Martin

1-855-234-5602

Michael Sam & Peta Murgatroyd

24 (6, 6, 6, 6) down from 28

Salsa

“Celebrate”—Pitbull

1-855-234-5603

Nastia Liukin & Derek Hough

34 (9, 8, 8, 9) up from 30

Rumba

“How Long Will I Love You?”—Ellie Goulding

1-855-234-5604

Noah Galloway & Sharna Burgess

30 (7, 7, 8, 8) up from 27

Argentine tango

“Rather Be”—Clean Bandit feat. Jess Glynne

1-855-234-5605

Patti LaBelle & Artem Chigvintsev

22 (6, 5, 5, 6) down from 28

Cha-cha-cha

“Oye 2014″—Santana feat. Pitbull

1-855-234-5606

Riker Lynch & Allison Holker:

34 (9, 7, 9, 9) up from 32

Salsa

“Limbo”—Daddy Yankee

1-855-234-5608

Robert Herjavec & Kym Johnson

29 (7, 7, 8, 7) up from 28

Rumba

“How Long Will I Love You?”—Ellie Goulding

1-855-234-5609

Rumer Willis & Valentin Chmerkovskiy

33 (8, 9, 8, 8) Same score

Salsa

“Turn the Beat Around”—Gloria Estefan

1-855-234-5610

Suzanne Somers & Tony Dovolani

25 (6, 6, 6, 7) down from 28

Samba

“Copacabana”—Barry Manilow

1-855-234-5611

Willow Shields & Mark Ballas

32 (8, 8, 8, 8) Same score

Paso doble

“Hanuman”—Rodrigo y Gabriela with John Tempesta

1-855-234-5612

Phone voting begins during the show on Mondays, and is open until 60 minutes after the conclusion of that show in your local time zone.

Online voting at both ABC.com and Facebook opens each Monday when the show begins on the East Coast at 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) and stays open until 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) the next day. During the season’s seventh, eighth, ninth and tenth week, online voting will open when the show begins on the East Coast at 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) and will stay open until 11 a.m. ET (8 a.m. PT) the following morning.

WonderCon ends today!

Sundays are usually the most relaxed day at comic conventions. Head on out to Anaheim for alien Easter eggs at WonderCon.

Today you can learn about fashion with Babs Tarr (Batgirl), Kevin Wada (She-Hulk),Jake Wyatt (Ms. Marvel), and Kris Anka (Uncanny X-Men) as they break down street fashion, superhero costumes, style versus form, and sexualization of fashion in mainstream comics. It might be informative, but it will definitely be a good time in room 213 from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.

There will also be a special DreamWorks Animation panel about a new original series: Dragons: Race to the Edge, along with the new adventure series Dinotrux. Plus, there will be glimpses into what’s in store for fan-favorite characters like King Julien and Puss In Boots. Even more surprises await as host Eric Bauza and Dragon executive producersArt Brown and Doug Sloan take you behind the scenes of these Netflix original series! Attendees will receive a WonderCon Anaheim exclusive Dragons print from DreamWorks Animation and a special gift from Netflix (supply limited to room capacity). Sunday, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Room 300AB.

You can also learn about the psychology of “The Walking Dead.” The Walking Dead explores ways people struggle to survive and hang onto their humanity in the worst situations. Psychology professionals Travis Langley (Batman and Psychology: A Dark and Stormy Knight), Elizabeth Ann (NerdLush), Josué Cardona (Geek Therapy), Patrick O’Connor (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Billy San Juan (Community Research Foundation), and Janina Scarlet (Superhero Therapy) use examples from the comics to discuss the psychology of trauma and triumph. They will be joined by novelist S. G. Browne (Breathers) and journalist Janey Tracey (Outer Places). Why do horrific circumstances bring out the worst in some people and the best in others? Is there hope? That’s from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

How about a world premiere? “Batman Unlimited: Animal Instincts.” Another storm is brewing in Gotham, and it’s not only raining cats and dogs but evil Cyber Animals! Be among the first to see how Batman and his team of superheroes meet the challenge in the World Premiere of Batman Unlimited: Animal Instincts. When the city is plagued by a slew of bizarre crimes committed by an animal-inspired villain squad known as the Animilitia-made up of Silverback, Cheetah, Killer Croc, and Man-Bat-Batman must swing into action to investigate. These animalistic villains bring new and exciting challenges for the hero of Gotham, and Batman must find a way to bring these criminal creatures to a halt! But could the Animilitia be working for powerful businessman Oswald Cobblepot, aka The Penguin? How does The Penguin’s new invention of robotic Cyber Animals fit into the mix? In the end, it’ll be up to the combined forces of Batman, Flash, Green Arrow, Nightwing, and Red Robin to combat these Animal Instincts. Catch this new flick, then stay for an entertaining panel featuring the voice of Batman himself, Roger Craig Smith (Batman: Arkham Origins),Yuri Lowenthal (Ben 10 franchise, Naruto), screenwriter Heath Corson, and other guests. Batman Unlimited: Animal Instincts arrives May 12, 2015 from Warner Bros. Home Entertainment on Blu-ray Combo Pack, DVD, and Digital HD. Room 300AB at 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Richard Hatch makes an appearance in a panel called “Battlestar in Crisis.” Richard Hatch (Battlestar Galactica’s Tom Zarek/Capt Apollo, Axanar, Cowboys and Engines) hosts a Q&A and discussion with the panel and audience on the fate and future of Battlestar Galactica. Panelists include Dr. Kevin Grazier (science consultant forBattlestar Galactica, Eureka, Fallen Skies, Defiance) and surprise guests. BG trailers and comic reels will be shown. That’s Sunday at 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

There’s much more but today is the last day!

WonderCon.
Anaheim
Convention
Center

800 W. Katella Ave.,
Anaheim, CA 92802
click for map(link is external)

Sunday: 10:30 AM – 5:00 PM

 

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